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20130228
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the man picked to lead the central intelligence agency was called today to defend his positions in the war on terror. john brennan's senate confirmation hearing revolved around several hotly debated policies. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman has our report. >> reporter: even before the hearing got truly under way, protesters from code pink disrupted john brennan's opening statement-- signaling that passions were running high on the targeted killings of terror suspects. >> they won't even tell congress what countries we are killing children in. >> reporter: the interruptions continued, and the chair of the sena
angeles police office wanted for murder. >> suarez: we turn to iran as the u.s. tightens sanctions but tehran shows no signs of halting its nuclear program or engaging in talks. >> brown: from our american graduate series, we have the story of a chicago non-profit that aims to change the lives of would-be dropouts. >> what's interesting about one goal is that it pinpoints and targets low-income, underperforming students in non- selective chicago public schools, students who are least likely to graduate from high school, let alone college. >> suarez: we look at newly released documents showing leaders in the catholic church in los angeles shielded pedophile priests and failed to report allegations of child abuse. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks with biographer jeanne theo- haris, who offers a complex portrait of the woman best known for refusing to give up her seat on an alabama bus in 1955. >> she is celebrated for one act and i think part of that celebration puts it all in the past, right, when the actual rosa parks keeps working on racial and social justice issues all the way up t
" continues, with a report from miles o'brien on what science can tell us aut thminds of rampage kilrs. andy williams called me collect inside the prisop. >> i didn't think 13 people were going to get shot. i just thought i'd make a lot of noise and the cops would show up. >> ifill: francis collins, head of the national institutes of health, walks us through president obama's call for a ten-year initiative to map the human brain. >> woodruff: plus, jeffrey brown reports on an archaeological find in the orkney islands off scotland that may provide new insight into religious practices in the neolithic age. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it was the starkest statement yet on the possible effect of automatic federal budget cuts, due to begin in nine days, on march first. defens
the hatches here, if any storms are coming. the last one ruined us totally. >> brown: and long before the worst hit, air travel was in a shambles. well over 4,000 flights were canceled through saturday, sending ripple effects across the country. the snow also halted amtrak and some mass transit service in the northeast. and for the latest on what's expected tonight and this weekend, we turn to bernie rayno, a meteorologist with accuweather. so what is the latest on the track of the storm and expected snow amounts? >> well, i will tell you, the worst of this storm we have been pointing out all week is going to be across southern new england. two storms as you mentioned, and the first storm across the midwest already producing quite a bit of snow across new york state. but the second storm as it strengthens and moves north and northeast, we're already starting to get bands of heavy snow now across new england, into toward boston, providence, hartford, snowing in new york city. and by tonight this storm is really going to start intensifying here. and anywhere in this white, new york city
on the monster storm from bernie rayno of accuweather. >> woodruff: then, should the u.s. arm the rebels in syria? ray suarez examines a growing rift between the white house and key members of the president's cabinet. >> brown: spencer michels has the story of new discoveries about mars coming from the rover vehicle known as "curiosity," the product of nasa's jet propulsion lab. >> it may sound familiar but what scientists here at jpl are actually looking for are signs of life past and present on the red planet >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with pulitzer- prize-winning humorist dave barry about miami, the "insane city" that's the focus of his new novel. >> the people come from everywhere, people just weird people are attracted to miami. the wildlife is weird, the weather is weird, it's a festering stew of weirdness. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation cre
before the march first deadline. for more on the sequestration and what it means for the u.s. military. i'm joined by deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. welcome, mr. secretary so let's just pick up with that comment from some republicans that this is exaggerated. >> well, for us in the defense department, unfortunately, it's not exaggerated. in fact, we don't want to take any of these steps. we certainly are trying to do it in the way that does the minimum damage to national security. we don't have a lot of flexibility, and we don't have a lot of time in that regard. sequester requires us to find $46 billion in the last half of the year, and then we have an additional problem with the lack of an appropriations bill, which is a particular problem for us. you put those two things together, and in some of accounts that fund training, for example, for army units, those accounts are 30% short over the year, and now we only have half the year in which to make up those savings. what that means is we're going to protect the wars in afghanistan-- we've got to nund them. we have to fund-- n
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)